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More than clump of cells


To the Editor:

On January 22, 1973, seven members of the U.S. Supreme Court decided to overturn the abortion laws of every state of the union. Thirty-six years ago, seven men decided that the right to life was no longer inalienable, but dependent solely on a woman's choice. A generation of Americans have had approximately one-fourth of their brothers and sisters destroyed before birth because of two U.S. Supreme Court decisions, Roe v. Wade and Doe v. Bolton.

After 36 years, the majority of Americans would probably fail a basic test about what Roe and Doe actually did.

Thirty-six years of abortion on demand have allowed our government and society to fail in their duty to provide life-affirming alternatives to women in crisis. No woman wants to have an abortion, yet every year more than a million women put themselves through this procedure. Abortion doesn't solve problems, it only creates new ones. Abortion doesn't help

women, it hurts them.

Recent advances in technology, including three-dimensional ultrasounds, have provided us with visual evidence of who we are losing at a rate of approximately 3,300 a day, 1.2 million a year. The entity in a woman's womb is more than a mere clump of cells but this living, growing and developing organism is in fact a human being. Embryology textbooks testify to this reality and even toddlers can understand this basic truth.

Yet most people in our society have turned a blind eye to the plight of the unborn and women who are experiencing an unplanned pregnancy. We've casually accepted abortion as the answer when it's obvious that intentionally killing vulnerable human beings is not a solution to any problem.

Eric G. Scott, Esq. Michigan Right to Life, North Branch
January 14, 2009

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